• Where did it all begin?

    The Hobbit, or There and Back Again, was written by John Ronald Reuel Tolkien and is the prelude to the master piece The Lord of the Rings...

  • Who is Bilbo Baggins?

    Bilbo Baggins is a Hobbit and the hero of the story...

  • Who is Smaug?

    Smaug is the great dragon who lives in the Lonely Mountain. As with all dragons, Smaug is very intelligent, loves gold and is extremely powerful...

  • The Movie

    The Hobbit movie is being produced and directed by Peter Jackson and filmed in New Zealand...

The Hobbit Glossary



Word
Page 1st Used
Meaning as used in The HobbitContext of use, sentence used in
afore
46
Before."You're a fat fool, William," said Bert, "as I've said afore this evening."
afresh
19
Again.See text above for lo.
ages
12
A period of the earth's history.He had not been down that way under The Hill for ages and ages, not since his friend the Old Took died, in fact, and the hobbits had almost forgotten what he looked like.
alighted
269
To get down as from a horse or a vehicle; descend; come to rest.He alighted stiffly on the ground before them, slowly flapped his wings, and bobbed towards Thorin.
ambling
40
Amble. To go at an easy pace.At  first they had passed through hobbit-lands, a wild respectable country inhabited by decent folk, with good roads, an inn or two, and now and then a dwarf or a farmer ambling by on business.
amends
270
Reparation, as for wrong or injury; atonement; satisfaction, compensation.They too think to find amends from your treasure, whether you are alive or dead.
array
267
To set in due order; orderly arrangement; ordered state of things.But all the men of arms who were still able, and the most of the Elvenking's array, got ready to march north to the Mountain.
Attercop
170
A spider.Attercop! Attercop!
audacious
25
Bold; daring; esp., recklessly or shamelessly bold; impudent.We are met together in the house of our friend and fellow conspirator, this most excellent and audacious hobbit - may the hair on his toes never fall out! all praise to his wine and ale!"
bannocks
58
A flat cake made of oatmeal, barley-meal, or the like, commonly cooked on a griddle.The bannocks are baking!
barrel
29
A cylinder or drum. The round part of a key.Here it is!" he said, and handed to Thorin a key with a long barrel and intricate wards, made of silver.
bay
295
A stand made by a hunted animal to face or repel pursuers, or, fig. by a person, etc. forced to face a foe or a difficulty.Now Bard was fighting to defend the Eastern spur, and yet giving slowly back; and the elf-lords were at bay about their king upon the southern arm, near to the watch-post on Ravenhill.
beats me To baffle, perplex.See text above for ell.
bebother
19
See text above for confusticate.
beset
279
To set, stud, or surround with something; also to surround as in a siege or attack, hem in; attack on all sides; assail.Though they are a grim folk, they are not likely to overcome the host that besets you; and even if they did so, what will you gain?
besieged
278
To lay siege to; beset with or as with a siege; assail persistently."Since such is your answer," he called in return, "I declare the Mountain besieged.
betterment
97
A making or becoming betterA sudden understanding, a pity mixed with horror, welled up in Bilbo's heart: a glimpse of endless unmarked days without light or hope of betterment, hard stone, cold fish, sneaking and whispering.
bewildered
18
To confuse completely as to direction or course; render utterly confused in mind, perplex completely; daze.Bilbo rushed along the passage, very angry, and altogether bewildered and bewuthered-this was the most awkward Wednesday he ever remembered.
bewuthered
18
See text above for bewildered.
bleat
72
To cry as a sheep, goat or calf; make a similar sound. The cry of sheep.See text above for yammer.
blest
177
blighter
46
A person who causes trouble or makes himself obnoxious (slang, Eng.)Poor little blighter, said William.
blimey
44
A vulgar corruption of blind me! or blame me!"Mutton yesterday, mutton today, and blimey, if it don't look like mutton again tomorrer," said one of the trolls.
blind
260
Without discernment, understanding, or judgement; not proceeding form or controlled by reason.At the twanging of the bows and the shrilling of the trumpets the dragon's wrath blazed to its height, till he was blind and mad with it.
blinking
17
keep delete?"Someone at the door!" he said, blinking.
booby
50
A stupid person; a dunce."You're a booby," said William.
boughs
110
A branch of a tree, esp. one of the larger or main branches.Dwalin and Balin had swarmed up a tall slender fir with few branches and were trying to find a place to sit in the greenery of the topmost boughs.
bowls
169
A game, common in Great Britain, in which the players rolled biased or weighted balls along the sward in a effort to bring them near as possible to a stationary ball called the jack; sometimes, skittles, ninepins, or ("American bowls") tenpins.See text above for quoits.
braces
13
Suspenders.I can't think what anybody sees in them," said our Mr. Baggins, and stuck one thumb behind his braces, and blew out another even bigger smoke-ring.
buffeted
206
Buffet. To strike as with the fist; beat; contend against as with blows. To deal blows; fight; struggle.See text above for draggled.
burglarious
45
Pertaining to or involving burglary.Of the various burglarious proceedings he had heard of picking the trolls' pockets seemed the least difficult, so at last he crept behind a tree just behind William.
cake
14
A mass of dough or batter baked or otherwise cooked in a definite form; a flat, comparatively thin mass of bread, esp., unleavened bread; an oat-cake.He had only just had breakfast, but he thought a cake or two and a drink of something would do him good after his fright.
canny
43
Safe to deal or meddle with (chiefly with a negative); quiet or gentle."You must go on and find out all about that light, and what it is for, and if all is perfectly safe and canny," said Thorin to the hobbit.
cape
126
A Spanish cloak (with a hood); also, a  separate article of attire, being a kind of short loose sleeveless cloak, fitting round the neck and falling over the shoulders as a protection against rain or cold. Waterproof capes of this kind are in common use.See text above for furrier.
cartage
237
The act or the cost of carting (to convey in a cart).What about cartage?
carven
183
Carved; fashioned or ornamented by carving.In a great hall with pillars hewn out of the living stone sat the Elvenking on a chair of carven wood.
cavalcade
43
A procession of persons on horseback.They take a pride in it, and Bilbo had sniffed more than once at what he called "all this dwarvish racket," as they went along, though I don't suppose you or I would notice anything at all on a windy night, not if the whole cavalcade had passed two feet off.
champing
69
To crush with the teeth and chew vigorously or noisily; munch; also to bite upon, esp. impatiently, as a horse its bit.At one end there was room for the ponies; and there they stood (mighty glad of the change) steaming, and champing in their nosebags.
Chestnuts
85
An old or stale joke, anecdote, etc. (slang). Hence, in extended use, anything trite, stale, or too often repeated."Chestnuts, chestnuts, he hissed."
circuitous
213
Of the nature of a circuit; roundabout; not direct.Horses and ponies had been sent round by circuitous paths to meet them at their appointed landing-place.
clamour
111
A loud outcry; vociferation; hence, a vehement expression of desire or dissatisfaction; also, any loud and continued noises,.Every now and then all the Wargs in the circle would answer their grey chief all together, and their dreadful clamour almost made the hobbit fall out of his pine-tree.
comely
284
Pleasing in appearance; fair; handsome.You are more worthy to wear the armour of elf-princes than many that have looked more comely in it.
commons
161
Food provided at a common table; as in colleges; hence food or provisions in general. Short commons -small meals.If you hadn't waked up, we should have left you to your idiotic dreams in the forest; you are no joke to carry even after weeks of short commons."
confusticate
19
To confuse, confound, perplex.Confusticate and bebother these dwarves! he said aloud.
copped
45
To catch; lay hold of; also, to steal."Blimey, Bert, look what I've copped!" said William.
cowered
229
To bend with knees and back; stand or squat in a bent position; esp. to crouch in fear or shame.Then the dwarves forgot their joy and their confident boasts of a moment before and cowered down in fright.
cram
265
crannies
220
A small, narrow opening, as in a wall, rock, etc.Out up there a silence reigned, broken by no bird or sound except that of the wind in the crannies of stone.
crazy Cob
171
Cob. Old English for spider; also, cob-web.See text above for Lazy Lob.
croaking
75
To utter a low, hoarse, dismal cry, as a frog or raven; hence to speak with a low, hollow voice; fig., to talk despondently; forebode evil; grumble; also, to die (slang) or to kill (slang).The yells and yammering, croaking, jibbering and jabbering ; howls, growls and curses; shrieking and skriking, that followed were beyond description.
dale
23
A vale or valley.The bells were ringing in the dale
defrayed
38
To pay the charges or expenses of a person.Terms: cash on delivery, up to and not exceeding one fourteenth of total profits (if any); all traveling expenses guaranteed in any event; funeral expenses to be defrayed by us or our representatives, if occasion arises and the matter is not otherwise arranged for.
dells
101
A deep, natural hollow in land, often with wooded slopes; a small valley; a vale.He was on a stony path winding downwards with a rocky wall on the left hand; on the other side the ground sloped away and there were dells below the level of the path overhung with bushes and low trees.
delves
23
An act of delving; the plunging (of a spade) into the ground.And harps of gold; where no man delves
depredations
17
A praying upon or plundering; robbery; ravage, waste.He had only just had a sip-in the corner, while the four dwarves sat around the table, and talked about mines and gold and troubles with the goblins, and the depredations of dragons, and lots of other things which he did not understand, and did not want to, for they sounded much too adventurous - when, ding-dong-a-ling-dang, his bell rang again, as if some naughty little hobbit-boy was trying to pull the handle off.
devices
25
The act of planning; also, a plan or scheme for effecting a purpose.See text above for policy.
draggled
206
To soil by dragging over damp ground or in the mud; make limp and soiled as with wet and dirt.Wet straw was in his draggled beard; he was so sore and stiff, so bruised and buffeted he could hardly stand or stumble through the shallow water to lie groaning on the shore.
drat
102
A word used in vague or mild malediction (an evil deed; a crime; an offense)."If we have got to go back now into those abominable tunnels to look for him, then drat him, I say."
draught
194
Drinking, or a drink or potion.Come give us a taste of your sleeping-draught before we fall to!
draught
229
Old form of draft. A current of air.Could there be a draught from that little hole?
droning
127
Emitting a dull, monotonous sound; characterized by a monotonous tone or utterance.There was a buzzing and a whirring and a droning in the air.
dry
272
Without mortar.But now their hopes were higher; for they had food for some weeks with care - chiefly cram, of course, and they were very tired of it; but cram is much better than nothing - and already the gate was blocked with a wall of squared stones laid dry, but very thick and high across the opening.
eerie
158
The laughter was the laughter of fair voices not of goblins, and the singing was beautiful, but it sounded eerie and strange, and they were not comforted, rather they hurried on from those parts with what strength they had left.
ell Include words like these?"What the 'ell William was a-thinkin' of to bring us into these parts at all, beats me - and the drink runnin' short, what's more," he said jogging the elbow of William, who was taking a pull at his jug.
engines
73
An invention; a machine or instrument used in warfare, as a battering-ram, catapult, etc; an instrument of torture.It is not unlikely that they invented some of the machines that have since troubled the world, especially the ingenious devices for killing large numbers of people at once, for wheels and engines and explosions always delighted them, and also not working with their own hands more than they could help; but in those days and those wild parts they had not advanced (as it is called) so far.
enmity
210
A feeling or condition of hostility; hatred; ill-will; animosity; antagonism; variance.The Elvenking was very powerful in those parts and the Master wished for no enmity with him, nor did he think much of old songs, giving his mind to trade and tolls, to cargoes and gold, to which habit he owed his position.
ere
22
Before.We must away ere break of day
et
44
Eat. Preterit of eat."Yer can't expect folk to stop here for ever just to be et by you and Bert.
eyrie
118
See aery. The nest of a bird of prey.He loosed Dori's ankles with a gasp and fell onto the rough platform of an eagle's eyrie .
faggots
58
A bundle or sticks, twigs, or small branches of trees bound together, used for fuel.The faggots are reeking,
fare
305
feint
294
A feigned or assumed appearance; a pretense; also, a movement made with the object of deceiving an adversary; an appearance of aiming at one part or point when another is the real object of attack.A few brave men were strung before them to make a feint of resistance, and many there fell before the rest drew back and fled to either side.
fells
22
A stretch of elevated waste land or pasture; a down.In hollow halls beneath the fells.
fender
21
A metal guard before an open fire; to keep back falling coals.Then they went back, and found Thorin with his feet on the fender smoking a pipe.
flagons
190
A large bottle for wine, etc.; also, a vessel for holding liquids, as for use at table, esp. one with a handle, a spout and usually a cover.He followed the two elves, until they entered a small cellar and sat down at a table on which two large flagons were set.
flummoxed
19
To bewilder; confound; bring to confusion.See text above for larders.
flustered
15
Confused, disconcerted.Yesterday he had been too flustered to do anything of the kind.
flying
156
To move or pass swiftly; move with a start or rush; spring with violence; also, to flee, run away or take flight.There was a flying sound of hooves on the path ahead.
foiled
259
A defeat, discomfiture, or baffling check; frustrate or baffle; also when used as a noun, the track of hunted game.Amid shrieks and wailing and the shouts of men he came over them, swept towards the bridges and was foiled!
fortnight
212
fray
302
A fight, skirmish, or battle.Then Bern stooped and lifted Thorin, who had fallen pierced with spears, and bore him out of the fray.
fretted
200
To move in agitation or commotion, as water.The barrels now all lashed together creaked and fretted.
froth
172
Fig., something unsubstantial or evanescent (to vanish away; disappear gradually).See text above for nippers.
furrier
126
A dealer in  or dresser of furs."Don't be a fool Mr. Baggins if you can help it; and in the name of all wonder don't mention the word furrier again as long as you are within a hundred miles of his house, nor rug, cape, tippet, muff, nor any other such unfortunate word!
furtive
253
galled
91
A sore on the skin, due to rubbing; an excoriation.Gollum used to wear it at first, till it tired him; and then he kept it in a pouch next his skin, till it galled him; and now usually he hid it in a hole in the rock on his island, and was always going back to look at it.
gammers
207
A rustic title or term for an old woman.See text above for greybeards.
giddy
100
Mad, insane; hence, furious or wild; also, having a confused, whirling sensation; affected with vertigo; dizzy; unstable.But they don't like the sun: it makes their legs wobble and their heads giddy.
gleams
152
gledes
262
Gleed. A live or burning coal; a fire or flame, cinders or coke.His last throes splintered it to sparks and gledes.
glowered
145
To stare or gaze intently; also, to look angrily or with sullen dislike or discontent.But in the evening when the dusk came on and the peaks of the mountains glowered against the sunset they made a camp and set a guard, and most of them slept uneasily with dreams in which there came the howl of hunting wolves and the cries of goblins.
gnashed
75
To strike or grind (the teeth) together, esp., in rage or pain.The Great Goblin gave a truly awful howl of rage when he looked at it, and all his soldiers gnashed their teeth, clashed their shields, and stamped.
greybeards
207
A man with a gray beard; hence, an old man.Other folk were far away; and some of the younger people in the town openly doubted the existence of any dragon in the mountain, and laughed at the greybeards and gammers who said that they had seen him flying in the sky in their young days.
guffawing
68
A loud, coarse burst of laughter; to laugh loudly and boisterously.They could hear the giants guffawing and shouting all over the mountainsides.
halloowing
100
Same as hollo. A call to attract attention; also, an exclamation of surprise, etc; to urge or incite by  shouting.See text above for hooting.
hark
59
To listen; harken: often used interjectionally, in the imperative (as, Hark!).And listen and hark
harts
146
The male of the deer, commonly the red deer, esp. after its fifth year.Sometimes Bilbo saw the horns of the harts sticking up out of the long grass, and at first he thought they were the dead branches of trees.
hauberk
289
Same as haubergeon. A short hauberk, reaching to the middle of the thighs; hence any hauberk. Hauberk: a piece of armor orig. intended for the protection of the neck and shoulders, but early developed into a long coat of mail reaching below the knees.He had hurried on through the night, and so had come upon them sooner than they had expected. Each one of his folk was clad in a hauberk of steel mail that hung to his knees, and his legs were covered with hose of a fine and flexible metal mesh, the secret of whose making was possessed by Dain's people.
haughty
19
Exalted, lofty, noble; also having or showing a feeling of lofty dignity, disdainfully proud, arrogant.Thorin indeed was very haughty, and said nothing about service; but poor Mr. Baggins said he was sorry so many times, that at last he grunted "pray don't mention it," and stopped frowning.
heady
190
hearth
18
The part of the floor of the room on which the fire is made or above which is a grate or the like for fire; the floor of a fireplace.A big jug of coffee bad just been set in the hearth, the seed-cakes were gone, and the dwarves were starting on a round of buttered scones, when there came - a loud knock.
helter-skelter
103
In a headlong, disorderly haste; hurry-scurry; pell-mell; also, a tumultuous haste or disorder.There was no time to count, as you know quite well, till we had dashed through the gate-guards, out of the lower door, and helter-skelter down here.
hind
157
The female of the deer, chiefly the red deer, esp. in and after the third year.Suddenly on the path ahead appeared some white deer, a hind and fawns as snowy white as the hart had been dark.
hither
99
On or toward this side; on the side or in the direction of the person speaking; nearer.Whistles blew, armour clashed, swords rattled, goblins cursed and swore and ran hither and thither, falling over one another and getting very angry.
hoard
22
Treasure, an accumulation of something laid by for preservation or future use; a stock of store, as of money, treasure.There many a gloaming golden hoard
hooting
100
To cry out or shout, esp. in disapproval or derision; an exclamation of dissatisfaction, impatience, etc.Of course they soon came down after him, hooting and hallooing, and hunting among the trees.
host
265
An army.But help came swiftly; for Bard at once had speedy messengers sent up the river to the Forest to ask the aid of the King of the Elves of the Wood, and these messengers had found a host already on the move, although it was then only the third day after the fall of Smaug.
hotfoot
259
With great speed in going; in hot haste.But the grim-voiced fellow ran hotfoot to the Master.
hustled
197
To shake, push, or shove roughly; often, to force roughly or hurriedly into, out of, or through a place.He had as much as he could do to prevent himself from being hustled and battered to bits; but at last the jostling crowd began to break up and swing off, one by one, under the stone arch and away.
imp
92
An offspring, usually a male child; also, a person as a scion (descendant) or offshoot, as of a noble house.Only a few hours ago he had worn it, and caught a small goblin-imp.
incantations
52
The chanting or uttering of words purporting to have magical power; a spell or charm; also, in general, magical ceremonies; magic, sorcery.But they could not open it, not though they all pushed while Gandalf tried various incantations.
ire
23
Anger, wrath.Then dragon's ire more fierce than fire
jabbering
75
To talk or utter rapidly, indistinctly, or unintelligibly; chatter unintelligibly or senselessly.See text above for croaking.
jibbering
75
To move restively sidewise or backward instead of forward, as an animal in harness; refuse to go on; balk.See text above for croaking.
jostling
195
To collide, to strike or push against as in passing; a collision, shock or push, as in jostling.Some were barrels really empty, some were tubs neatly packed with a dwarf each; but down they all went, one after another, with many a clash and a bump, thudding on top of ones below, smacking into the water, jostling against the walls of the tunnel, knocking into one another, and bobbing away down the current.
kine
196
Archaic plural of cow. Used in numbers combinations with a sense of 'kingly-royal'Where the kine and oxen feed!
knot
175
laburnums
13
A small leguminous tree, Laburnum laburnum, having pendulous racemens of yellow flowers.See text above for laburnums.
lamented
167
A mournful expression of grief or sorrow, as for the dead or for any loss or misfortune."O! why did we not remember Beorn's advice, and Gandalf's!" he lamented.
larders
19
A room or place where meat or other provisions are kept; a pantry; hence,  the store of provisions in a house."Seems to know as much about the inside of my larders as I do myself!" thought Mr. Baggins, who was feeling positively flummoxed, and was beginning to wonder whether a most wretched adventure had not come right into his house.
Lazy Lob
171
Lob. Old English for spider.Lazy Lob and crazy Cob
lintel
219
A horizontal timber or stone above a door or other opening, to support the structure above.See text above for post.
lo
19
An exclamation of surprise, greeting, etc. Also, look! see! behold!Lo and behold! there stood Balin and Dwalin at the door of the kitchen, and Fili and Kili behind them, and before he could say knife they had whisked the trays and a couple of small tables into the parlour and set out everything afresh.
looking-glass
252
A mirror made of glass with a metallic or amalgam backing. A mirror.Still I wish there was a looking-glass handy!"
lopped
128
To cut off the branches, twigs, etc., of a tree or other plant.In the middle there was lying a great oak-trunk with many lopped branches beside it.
lout
46
An awkward, stupid fellow; a clown."And you're a lout!"
Lumme
45
A corruption of (Lord) love me."Lumme , if I knows! What are yer?"
marauding
218
To move in quest of plunder; make a raid for booty; the act of marauding.On this western side there were fewer signs of the dragon's marauding feet, and there was some grass for their ponies.
mark
291
mattocks
290
A kind of pick with an arm or blade like that of an adz, and commonly with another arm opposite either like a narrow ax-blade or terminating in a point.In battle they wielded heavy two-handed mattocks; but each of them had also a short broad sword at his side and a round shield slung at his back.
mead
137
An alcoholic liquor made by fermenting a mixture of honey and water; also any of various non-alcoholic beverages.They sat long at the table with their wooden drinking-bowls filled with mead.
mead
196
A meadow. Now chiefly poetic.Back to pasture, back to mead,
mere
196
A lake; a pond.Up from mere and pool at night!
mince-pies
19
A pie filled with minced meat. Mince - to cut up or chop small, or  in little pieces.And mince-pies and cheese, said Bofur.
mirth
165
Joy; delight.Their gleaming hair was twined with flowers; green and white gems glinted on their collars and their belts; and their faces and their songs were filled with mirth.
mock
30
Being an imitation or having merely the semblance of something; counterfeit; sham; false; mimic; imitate; ridicule.He turned with mock-politeness to Bilbo.
morsel
16
A bite, mouthful, or small portion of food, or the like; a bit or dish of food of specified character.Lots! Bilbo found himself answering, to his own surprise; and he found himself scuttling off, too, to the cellar to fill a pint beer-mug, and to the pantry to fetch two beautiful round seed-cakes which he had baked that afternoon for his after-supper morsel.
mould
138
Loose, friable earth, esp. such as is rich in organic matter and favorable to the growth of plants.and leaves were laid upon the mould.
mouldered
253
To turn to dust by natural decay; crumble; waste away.Though all the old adornments were long mouldered or destroyed, and though all was befouled and blasted with the comings and goings of the monster, Thorin knew every passage and every turn.
muddled
194
To render confused or stupid with drink, or as drink does."Save us, Galion!" cried some, "you began your feasting early and muddled your wits!
muff
126
A thick tubular case covered with fur or other material, into which the hands are thrust for warmth.See text above for furrier.
mustering
302
mutton
37
The flesh of sheep, used as food; specif. the  flesh of the well-grown or more mature sheep, as distinguished form lamb.Roast Mutton (chapter title)
Necromancer
34
One who practices necromancy. The pretended art of divination through communication with the dead; the black art, hence, magic in general, enchantment, conjuration. A wizard, conjurer.How he got there I don't know, but I found him a prisoner in the dungeons of the Necromancer ."
ninepins
169
A game played with nine wooden pins at which a ball is bowled to knock them down.See text above for quoits.
nipped
105
To compress sharply between two surfaces or points.In the flash which killed the goblins that were grabbing him he had nipped inside the crack, just as it snapped to.
nipped
169
nippers
172
One who or that which nips; a device for nipping, as pincers or forceps; one of the great claws of a crustacean.The spiders saw the sword, though I don't suppose they knew what it was, and at once the whole lot of them came hurrying after the hobbit along the ground and the branches, hairy legs waving, nippers and spinners snapping, eyes popping, full of froth and rage.
nooks
69
A corner, as in a room; any small recess; a secluded or sheltered place.It had a dry floor and some comfortable nooks.
nosebags
69
A bag, usually made of strong canvas and leather, which is suspended from a horse's head (the open end covering his nose) so that he may eat the provender contained in it.See text above for champing.
noser
95
Someone who is prying, inquisitive.The Baggins has got it in its pocketses; the nassty noser has found it, we says.
obscurest
210
oddments
91
An odd article, bit, remnant, or the like, or an article belonging to a broken or incomplete set.Not far away was his island, of which Bilbo knew nothing, and there in his hiding-place he kept a few wretched oddments, and one very beautiful thing, very beautiful, very wonderful.
oddments
279
ogres
88
A monster, commonly represented as a hideous giant, of fairy-tales and popular legends, supposed to live on human flesh.Poor Bilbo sat in the dark thinking of all the horrible names of all the giants and ogres he had ever heard told of in tales, but not one of them had done all these things.
old songs
314
Used to denote a very small or trifling sum, amount or value; also, for a mere trifle, for little or nothing.It was now nearly lunchtime, and most of the things had already been sold, for various prices from next to nothing to old songs (as is not unusual at auctions).
onset
296
A beginning or start.And as the valley widened his onset grew ever slower.
outlandish
37
Foreign-looking, strange, or odd; bizarre."Don't be a fool, Bilbo Baggins!" he said to himself, "thinking of dragons and all that outlandish nonsense at your age!"
painter
155
A rope, usually at the bow, for fastening a boat to a ship, stake, etc."It was tied after all," said he, looking at the snapped painter that was still dangling from it.
pallid
249
Pale; esp., unnaturally pale in complexion or hue, or wan.Slowly it grew to a little globe of pallid light.
palpitating
61
To pulsate with unnatural rapidity, as the heart, from exertion, emotion; also, to quiver or tremble, as a body, a person or anything else.Now it is a strange thing, but things that are good to have and days that are good to spend are soon told about, and not much to listen to; while things that are uncomfortable palpitating, and even gruesome, may make a good tale, and take a deal of telling anyway.
parapet
60
A protective wall or barrier at the edge of a balcony, roof, bridge, or the like.There was only a narrow bridge of stone without a parapet, as narrow as a pony could well walk on; and over that they had to go, slow and careful, one by one, each leading his pony by the bridle.
paraphernalia
39
Personal belongings; articles of personal adornment or attire; trappings; equipments; in general, appurtenances (accessory).They were on ponies, and each pony was slung about with all kinds of baggages, packages, parcels, and paraphernalia.
parley
275
To speak, talk, or confer; hold parley with an opponent; specif., to hold an informal conference with an enemy, under a truce, as between active hostilities.We came expecting to find none living here; yet now that we are met there is matter for a parley and a council."
perilous
218
Full of or attended with peril; hazardous, dangerous, risky; exposure to injury.They were alone in the perilous waste without hope of further help.
plaited
290
A braid, as of hair or straw.Their beards were forked and plaited and thrust into their belts.
plumped
16
To drop heavily or suddenly and directly; with a heavy or sudden fall or drop.Bilbo plumped down the beer and the cake in front of them, when loud came a ring at the bell again, and then another ring.
policy
25
A definite course of action adopted as expedient or from other considerations; also, a specificic course or line of action adopted and pursued by a government or ruler."We are met to discuss our plans, our ways, means, policy and devices .
portcullis
188
In a fortification, a strong grating, as of iron, made to slide in vertical grooves at the sides of the gateway of a fortified place, and let down to prevent entrance.There the rocky roof came down close to the surface of the stream, and from it a portcullis could be dropped right to the bed of the river to prevent anyone coming in or out that way.
poser
86
A question, a problem, or matter that poses, or puzzles completely.But it proved a nasty poser for Gollum.
post
219
No sign was there of post or lintel or threshold, nor any sign of bar or bolt or key-hole; yet they did not doubt that they had found the door at last.
pray
15
To entreat (ask earnestly for) or beseech (a person, etc.) for something; make earnest petition to (a person, etc.) as to do something, or that something may be.When the silence that followed had become uncomfortable, he added: "I am just about to take tea; pray come and have some with me."
prosy
14
Given to discoursing in a commonplace, dull, or wearisome manner.You will notice already that Mr. Baggins was not quite so prosy as he liked to believe, also that he was very fond of flowers.
puffed
16
To breathe quick and hard.Gandalf for certain this time, he thought as he puffed along the passage.
purloined
44
To take dishonestly, steal, of filch; to commit theft.A really first-class and legendary burglar would at this point have picked the trolls' pockets - it is nearly always worthwhile if you can manage it -, pinched the very mutton off the spits, purloined the beer, and walked off without their noticing him.
quaff
72
To drink wine or the like in large drafts, as with hearty enjoyment.While Goblins quaff, and Goblins laugh,
quays
209
An artificial landing place, as of masonry, built along navigable water, for the use of vessels arriving, unloading or loading cargo, etc.This was a wide circle of quiet water surrounded by the tall piles on which were built the greater houses, and by long wooden quays with many steps and ladders going down to the surface of the lake.
queer
11
Strange, odd, peculiar, eccentric, in appearance or character.Still it is probable that Bilbo, her only son, although he looked and behaved exactly like a second edition of his solid and comfortable father, got something a bit queer in his makeup from the Took side, something that only waited for a chance to come out.
quoits
169
Orig., a discus; now, a flattish iron or other ring thrown in play to encircle a peg stuck in the ground or to come as close to it as possible, the game so played.As a boy he used to practise throwing stones at things, until rabbits and squirrels, and even birds, got out of his way as quick as lightning if they saw him stoop; and even grownup he had still spent a deal of his time at quoits, dart-throwing, shooting at the wand, bowls, ninepins and other quiet games of the aiming and throwing sort - indeed he could do lots of things, besides blowing smoke-rings, asking riddles and cooking, that I haven't had time to tell you about.
rags
41
A fragmentary bit of anything. In this case clouds.The wind broke up the grey clouds, and a wandering moon appeared above the hills between the flying rags.
ravening
295
To seize as spoil or prey; also, to devour voraciously; to seek plunder or prey.There a host of Wargs came ravening and with them came the bodyguard of Bolg, goblins of huge size with scimitars of steel.
recompense
264
To make compensation to (a person, etc.); repay; remunerate, reward, or requite for service, aid, etc.; make up to by payment or otherwise for loss, injury, suffering, etc.From whom should we claim the recompense of our damage, and aid for our widows and orphans?"
reek
217
Smoke, vapor or steam emitted or exhaled, issue, rise.But he might be gone away some time, or he might be lying out on the mountain-side keeping watch, and still I expect smokes and steams would come out of the gates: all the halls within must be filled with his foul reek."
reeking
58
Smoke, vapor or steam emitted or exhaled, issue, rise.See text above for faggots.
remuneration
31
To requite (repayment), recompense, or reward (a person) for services, work, trouble, etc.; the act of remuneration."Also I should like to know about risks, out-of-pocket expenses, time required and remuneration, and so forth" - by which he meant: "What am I going to get out of it? and am I going to come back alive?"
rending
295
To separate into part with force or violence; to tear apart, split, divide.Already many of the goblins were flying back down the river to escape from the trap; and many of their own wolves were turning upon them and rending the dead and the wounded.
rent
138
An opening made by  rending or tearing; a tear, as in a garment; a split, break, or fissure.where racing clouds were torn and rent.
repose
38
To lay to rest; refresh by rest; to take rest from exertion or toil.Thinking it unnecessary to disturb your esteemed repose, we have proceeded in advance to make requisite preparations, and shall await your respected person at the Green Dragon Inn, Bywater, at 11 a.m. sharp.
routed
32
To bring or get in poking about, searching, etc.; to fetch or get from a place, by vigorous action.Then he went back and crept in through the Front Gate and routed out all the halls, and lanes, and tunnels, alleys, cellars, mansions and passages.
row
46
A violent disturbance or commotion; a noisy dispute or quarrel; to assail roughly.Then there was a gorgeous row.
rug
126
A mat or the like made from the pelt of an animal.See text above for furrier.
rumour
230
To make a murmuring sound.The dwarves heard the awful rumour of his flight, and they crouched against the walls of the grassy terrace cringing under boulders, hoping somehow to escape the frightful eyes of the hunting dragon.
runes
8
Any of the letters or characters of an alphabet (in varying forms) used by the ancient Teutonic peoples, esp., the Scandinavians; hence, something written or inscribed in such characters.Runes were old letters originally used for cutting or scratching on wood, stone, or metal, and so were thin and angular.
scimitar
295
Simitar. A short, curved, single-edged sword used by the Turks, Persians, etc.See text above for ravening.
scowled
27
To draw down or contract the brows in a sullen or angry manner; look with a scowl; to have a gloomy or threatening aspect.He scowled so angrily at Gloin that the dwarf huddled back in his chair; and when Bilbo tried to open his mouth to ask a question, he turned and frowned at him and stuck oat his bushy eyebrows, till Bilbo shut his mouth tight with a snap.
scrabbling
92
To scratch or scrape about, as with the claws or hands.He was on his island, scrabbling here and there, searching and seeking in vain.
scuffling
139
To walk about without raising the feet; shuffle.There was a growling sound outside, and a noise as of some great animal scuffling at the door.
scuttled
14
To run with quick, hurried steps.With that the hobbit turned and scuttled inside his round green door, and shut it as quickly as he dared, not to seen rude.
shingly
198
Small, water-worn stones or pebbles such as lie in loose sheets or beds on the seashore.This had a shingly shore under hanging banks and was walled at the eastern end by a little jutting cape of hard rock.
shipped
198
To take in (water) over the side, as a vessel does when waves break over it.Luckily he was very light, and the barrel was a good big one and being rather leaky had now shipped a small amount of water.
shirk
72
One who seeks to avoid work, duty, etc.Work, work! Nor dare to shirk,
shiver
66
To break or split into fragments or splinters; shatter.The lightning splinters on the peaks, and rocks shiver, and great crashes split the air and go rolling and tumbling into every cave and hollow; and the darkness is filled with overwhelming noise and sudden light.
shod
290
shooting at the wand
169
See text above for quoits.
shrieking
75
To utter a loud, sharp, shrill cry; of persons, to cry out sharply at a high pitch of voice, often wildly or frantically, as with terror, rage, pain, delight, etc.See text above for croaking.
skriking
75
To utter in a shrill, harsh cry.See text above for croaking.
slowcoach
193
One who is slow in moving, acting, working, thinking, etc. one deficient in quickness, energy, briskness, etc. In American English it would be slowpoke."I shall be angry if the old slowcoach is late," said another.
smart
92
To be a source of sharp local and unusually superficial pain, to feel a sharp pain.He might even venture into places where the torches were lit and made his eyes blink and smart; for he would be safe.
smithereens
244
Small fragments: as to knock a thing to smithereens.He was breaking rocks to pieces, smashing wall and cliff with the lashings of his huge tail, till their little lofty camping ground, the scorched grass, the thrush's stone, the snail-covered walls, the narrow ledge, and all disappeared in a jumble of smithereens, and an avalanche of splintered stones fell over the cliff into the valley below.
smote
99
Preterit of smite. Afflict, chasten, or punish in a grievous manner; affect mentally with a sudden pang; hence, to affect suddenly and strongly with a specified feeling or sentiment.A pang of fear and loss, like an echo of Gollum's misery, smote Bilbo, and forgetting even to draw his sword he struck his hands into his pockets.
smote
117
Preterit of smite. To strike or hit hard, as with the hand, a stick or weapon, etc., or as the hand or a weapon does.Over them swooped the eagles; the dark rush of their beating wings smote them to the floor or drove them far away; their talons tore at goblin faces.
snag
94
Any sharp or rough projection.Terrified he tried to run faster, but suddenly he struck his toes on a snag in the floor, and fell flat with his little sword under him.
snapdragons
13
A plant of the scrophulariaceous genus Antirrhinum, esp. A. Majus, an herb long cultivated for its spikes of showy flowers, of various colors, with a corolla that has been supposed to look like the mouth of a dragon.They used to go up like great lilies and snapdragons and laburnums of fire and hang in the twilight all evening!"
snuffling
111
To draw air into the nose for the purpose of smelling something. To inhale, perceive by snuffling; examine by smelling.They left guards at the foot of the tree in which Dori and Bilbo were, and then went snuffling about till they had smelt out every tree that had anyone in it.
solemnities
208
sorrel
107
Any of various plants of the genus Rumex, having succulent acid leaves used in salads, sauces, etc.He nibbled a bit of sorrel, and he drank from a small mountain-stream that crossed the path, and he ate three wild strawberries that he found on its bank, but it was not much good.
spinners
172
A spider; esp. one which spins a web.See text above for nippers.
splayed
97
Spread out; wide and flat; turned outward; fig. clumsy or awkward; oblique or awry.He seemed to be crouched right down with his flat hands splayed on the floor, and his head thrust out, nose almost to the stone.
spluttered
86
To talk hastily and confusedly or incoherently, as in excitement or embarrassment.He hissed to himself, and still he did not answer; he whispered and spluttered.
spoil
270
To strip (a defeated or fallen enemy, etc.) of arms, armour, or the like; strip of goods, of valuables, etc. by force, as in war.The news of the death of the guardian has already gone far and wide, and the legend of the wealth of Thror has not lost in the telling during many years; many are eager for a share of the spoil.
stay
287
To stop or halt; cease or desist; pause or wait; as for a moment, before proceeding or continuing.Stay !
stiff
149
stifling
193
store
186
The supply or stock of necessities stored up, as for future use; supplies of food, clothing, etc; a supply of anything.He was hungry too outside, for he was no hunter; but inside the caves he could pick up a living of some sort by stealing food from store or table when no one was at hand.
stratagems
241
A piece of generalship; an artifice in war; a plan, scheme, or trick for deceiving the enemy.That turned the conversation, and they all began discussing dragon-slayings historical, dubious, and mythical, and the various sorts of stabs and jabs and undercuts, and the different arts, devices and stratagems by which they had been accomplished.
studs
13
A small button or fastener, commonly of metal, bone, or the like and in the form of a small knob and a disk connected by a stem, used (when passing through small button holes or the like) for holding together parts of dress or for ornament. Cufflinks.Not the wandering wizard that gave Old Took a pair of magic diamond studs that fastened themselves and never came undone till ordered?
succoured
277
British preferred form of succor; to run under; run to aid; help; to help or relieve in difficulty, want or distress; to furnish with military assistance; auxiliary forces; reinforcements."The Elvenking is my friend, and he has succoured the people of the Lake in their need, though they had no claim but friendship on him," answered Bard.
surly
185
Lordly, arrogant, or domineering; hence churlishly rude or ill-humored or in the manner, tone, expression, etc. Uncivil or morose.They were surly and angry and did not even pretend to be polite.
tarry
291
To delay; also, to wait for, or await.But the Elvenking said: "Long will I tarry, ere I begin this war for gold.
third time pays for all
224
But 'third time pays for all' as my father used to say, and somehow I don't think I shall refuse.
thither
99
To or toward that place or point.See text above for hither.
thongs
180
A narrow strip of hide of leather, used as a fastening; also, to bind or fasten with a thong.Then the elves put thongs on him, and shut him in one of the inmost caves with strong wooden doors, and left him.
threashold
219
See text above for post.
throng
17
A great number of things crowded or considered together; also to fill or occupy with as with a crowd.Let us join the throng!
throttled
45
To stop the breath of by compressing the throat; strangle; sometimes, to choke or suffocate in any way."Bilbo Baggins, a bur - a hobbit," said poor Bilbo, shaking all over, and wondering how to make owl-noises before they throttled him.
thrumming
227
Any dull, monotonous sound.There he lay, a vast red-golden dragon, fast asleep; a thrumming came from his jaws and nostrils, and wisps of smoke, but his fires were low in slumber.
tidings
261
Happenings, tidings, news; the announcement of an event or occurrence not previously made known.And while Bard paused in wonder it told him of tidings up in the Mountain and of all that it had heard.
tippet
126
An article of dress, usually of fur or wool, for covering the neck; a band of fur, worn about the neck.See text above for furrier.
toe
169
Put for the foot as a whole or the point of the foot; also, the part of a shoe or stocking which covers the toes; a part resembling a toe or the toes, in shape or position; the lower extremity or projection of anything, a point, tip, often identical with foot.There was a muffled yelp inside, and a toe shot up and kicked the spider straight and hard.
Tomnoddy
170
A foolish or stupid person.Old Tomnoddy, all big body,
tomorrer
44
A slang pronunciation of tomorrow.See text above for blimey.
toothsome
43
Pleasing to the taste; palatable; also, fond of savory food.There was a fine toothsome smell.
toss-pot
194
A habitual drinker."There is nothing in the feeling of weight in an idle toss-pot's arms.
town-baiting
261
track
40
The mark, or series of marks, left by anything that has passed along; a wheel-rut; a series of footprintsor other marks left by an animal or person."To think it will soon be June," grumbled Bilbo as he splashed along behind the others in a very muddy track.
train
292
A line or procession of persons, vehicles, animals, etc., traveling together.They ride upon wolves and Wargs are in their train!"
trestles
136
A frame used as a support, consisting typically of a horizontal beam or bar fixed at each end to a pair of spreading legs; sometimes, the whole frame which supports the top of a table.Quickly they got out boards and trestles from the side walls and set them up near the fire.
tunic
128
Undergarment. A garment like a shirt or a gown, worn by both sexes among the ancient Greeks and Romans.He was clothed in a tunic of wool down to his knees, and was leaning on a large axe.
tuppence
160
British twopence.They did not care tuppence about the butterflies, and were only made more angry when he told them of the beautiful breeze, which they were too heavy to climb up and feel.
turnkey
194
One who has charge of the keys of a prison; a prison keeper, jailer or warden.No need to wake the turnkey yonder.
twitter
51
To move tremulously, shake, or tremble.For just at that moment the light came over the hill, and there was a mighty twitter in the branches.
unassessably
238
Assessably. In a way liable to assessment; ratably.Surely, O Smaug the unassessably wealthy, you must realize that your success has made you some bitter enemies?"
vagabond
209
One who is without fixed abode  and wanders from place to place; esp. an idle wanderer without visible means of earning an honest  livelihood; a tramp or a vagrant; also, an idle, worthless fellow; a scamp; a rascal."These are prisoners of our king that have escaped, wandering vagabond dwarves that could not give any good account of themselves, sneaking through the woods and molesting our people!"
vanguard
294
The foremost division of an army; the van; a part of an army detached from the main body to clear the way and guard against surprise from the front.Ere long the vanguard swirled round the spur's end and came rushing into Dale.
venerable
61
Commanding respect by reason of age and dignity of appearance.He was as noble and as fair in face as an elf-lord, as strong as a warrior, as wise as a wizard, as venerable as a king of dwarves, and as kind as summer.
vexed
63
To irritate, annoy, make angry. To feel distressed, worried, or annoyed."What do they say?" asked Gandalf and Thorin together, a bit vexed perhaps that even Elrond should have found this out first, though really there had not been a chance before, and there would not have been another until goodness knows when.
viols
22
A musical instrument, of various sizes, shapes, etc., having a hollow body, a neck, a finger board, and strings, and played with a bow; esp., an old (medieval and later) type having from five to seven strings, and made in four sizes. A violin.They came back with viols as big as themselves, and with Thorin's harp wrapped in a green cloth.
Wain
204
Wagon; vehicle, or cart. The name for the seven major stars of the constellation Ursa Major, the Great Bear. Known in England as the Plough and in America as the Big Dipper.Only from the map did Bilbo know that away up there, where the stars of the Wain were already twinkling, the Running River came down into the lake from Dale and with the Forest River filled with deep waters what must once have been a great deep rocky valley.
waning
216
To draw to a close, or approach an end.They were come to the Desolation of the Dragon, and they were come at the waning of the year.
wards
29
Each of the ridges projecting from the inside plate of a lock, serving to prevent the passage of any key the bit of which is not provided with incisions of corresponding form and size. Each of the incisions in the bit of a key, corresponding to the 'wards' of the lock.See text above for barrel.
warrant
74
To afford warrant or sanction for, or justify; to give a formal assurance, or guarantee or promise."Up to no good, I'll warrant!
waxing
262
To increase in extent or size; of the moon, to undergo the periodical increase in the extent of its illuminated portion before the full (as opposed to wane).The waxing moon rose higher and higher and the wind grew loud and cold.
waylaid
54
To lie in wait for (a traveler, passer-by, etc.) on the way; fall upon or assail from ambush, as in order to rob, seize, or slay.It was they who told me that three of them had come down from the mountains and settled in the woods not far from the road: they had frightened everyone away from the district, and they waylaid strangers.
waylaid
209
well-to-do
9
Having a sufficiency of means for comfortable living, well off, or prosperous.This hobbit was a very well-to-do hobbit, and his name was Baggins.
Were-worms
27
A mythical beast.Tell me what you want done, and I will try it, if I have to walk from here to the East of East and fight the wild Were-worms in the Last Desert.
whinnying
68
Of a horse, to utter its characteristic call or cry; neigh.Soon they were getting drenched and their ponies were standing with their heads down and their tails between their legs, and some of them were whinnying with fright.
wily
233
Full of, marked by, or proceeding from wiles; crafty, cunning.Had he known more about dragons and their wily ways, he might have teen more frightened and less hopeful of catching this one napping.
wits
17
Understanding, intelligence.I really must sit down for a minute and collect my wits, and have a drink."
wrath
231
Angry; strong, stern or fierce anger.Long he had hunted in vain till the dawn chilled his wrath and he went back to his golden couch to sleep – and to gather new strength.
wretched
19
Deeply unhappy in mind.See text above for larders.
wretched
187
Deplorably unfortunate in condition or circumstances; miserable; pitiable; deeply unhappy in mind; in an unsatisfactory physical condition.Thorin was too wretched to be angry any longer at his misfortunes, and was even beginning to think of telling the king all about his treasure and his quest (which shows how low-spirited he had become), when he heard Bilbo's little voice at his keyhole.
wrought
22
Worked; elaborated.They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
yammer
72
Mourn, complain, sad, mournful; to lament, wail, whine, the act of yammering; a loud or persistent talk.Batter and beat! Yammer and bleat!
yer
44
Vulgar pronunciation of your."Shut yer mouth!" he said as soon as he could.
yore
22
Of old; years ago; long ago.The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,

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